Books Acquired, Some Time in April, 2014

Got way way behind on this feature of the blog this month. I don’t even know if readers like this feature, this “Books Acquired” thing. It’s mostly been a way to give some kind of press for unsolicited review copies, as well as books I buy compulsively.

Anyway: I’m not too into the cozy mystery thing, but I love this cover for some reason. Just makes me laugh:

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From the Kirkus review of Hannah Dennison’s Murder at Honeychurch Hall:

Kat Stanford quit her job as star of the reality TV show Fakes & Treasures, hoping to find a quiet place to open an antiques store with her mother, Iris. She wasn’t counting on Iris’ impetuous decision to buy a carriage house from the dowager Countess of Grenville, mother of the owner of Honeychurch Hall. Arriving in Little Dipperton, Devon, to help her mother settle into what sounded like a picturesque cottage, Kat finds Iris living instead in a dilapidated building with holes in the floors; antiquated fixtures; Kat’s father’s ashes in a Tupperware container; and aggressively spiteful neighbors, Eric Pugsley and his wife, the leather-clad housekeeper. Iris insists they’re trying to drive her out of the carriage house, and Kat isn’t sure that would be so bad, especially after the Honeychurch nanny, who warned her about the place, disappears. Worse yet, a conversation Kat overhears between Eric and the Earl of Grenville makes Iris’ suspicions sound uncomfortably plausible. The earl’s first wife died from what were supposedly natural causes but possibly weren’t, a 20-year-old robbery has never been solved, and mystery surrounds a pair of toy bears, not to mention the odd ghost. Kat’s even more shocked to discover that Iris has a secret identity and a closer connection to Honeychurch Hall than her daughter imagined. When she stumbles on a body in a hidden grotto, the only element missing from the well-stuffed plot is romance—a deficiency the local detective inspector just might remedy.

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The jacket of The Forever Watch describes author David Ramierez as an “ex-scientist,” which I find strangely perplexing. Does one stop being a scientist? Is it possible? Give up the science game?

Publisher’s blurb:

All that is left of humanity is on a thousand-year journey to a new planet aboard one ship, The Noah, which is also carrying a dangerous serial killer…

As a City Planner on the Noah, Hana Dempsey is a gifted psychic, economist, hacker and bureaucrat and is considered “mission critical.” She is non-replaceable, important, essential, but after serving her mandatory Breeding Duty,  the impregnation and birthing that all women are obligated to undergo, her life loses purpose as she privately mourns the child she will never be permitted to know.

When Policeman Leonard Barrens enlists her and her hacking skills in the unofficial investigation of his mentor’s violent death, Dempsey finds herself increasingly captivated by both the case and Barrens himself. According to Information Security, the missing man has simply “Retired,” nothing unusual. Together they follow the trail left by the mutilated remains. Their investigation takes them through lost dataspaces and deep into the uninhabited regions of the ship, where they discover that the answer may not be as simple as a serial killer after all.

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Will Thomas’s Fatal Inquiry is also new in hardback. From Publisher’s Weekly’s write up:

Thomas’s witty sixth Victorian thriller featuring private enquiry agent Cyrus Barker (after 2008′s The Black Hand) provides welcome glimpses of Barker’s early life. As a 12-year-old in strife-torn China, Barker trusted Sebastian Nightwine — a British Army officer Barker met after the death of his missionary parents — with his older brother’s life, and he was betrayed. Within hours of Nightwine’s return to London, after years abroad, clues planted near the body of a murdered lord implicate Barker in the crime. Barker flees, dodging through London just steps ahead of Scotland Yard while seeking evidence to exonerate himself. Meanwhile, Barker’s assistant, Thomas Llewelyn, encounters a violent gang and a beautiful assassin, both acting at Nightwine’s command. It takes all of the two agents’ considerable ingenuity to keep pace with this remorseless opponent in a battle full of surprises to the end. Readers will relish the appealing characters, clever twists, and colorful vision of late 19th-century London.

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2 comments

  1. andrea norwood · April 26

    this book sounds like it may be heaped with cozy fireplace mystery and fun.

    Like

  2. randomkhaos · April 26

    I like the books acquired blog.

    Like

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