How to Stop Living and Start Worrying — Simon Critchley

Books, philosophy, Postmodernism, Reviews, Writers

Simon Critchley’s latest book How to Stop Living and Start Worrying picks up where his last work, The Book of Dead Philosophers, left off. Both works explore what Critchley contends to be the signal problem of all philosophy; namely, how one might live a meaningful life against the backdrop of inevitable death. In Dead Philosophers, Critchley plumbed…

Simon Critchley on Terrence Malick’s The Thin Red Line

Criticism, Directors, Film, Writers

In his new book, How to Stop Living and Start Worrying, Simon Critchley talks about death in Terrence Malick’s film The Thin Red Line (you can read Critchley’s earlier essay “Calm — On Terrence Malick’s The Thin Red Line” here)— So, the hero of The Thin Red Line is this character Witt. And we meet him…

The Book of Dead Philosophers — Simon Critchley

Books, Reviews

A cursory glance at Simon Critchley’s skinny new work, The Book of Dead Philosophers, might lead one to misjudge the book as an ephemeral, superfluous, and even downright jokey sort of “Philosophy for Dummies.” That would be a mistake. While The Book of Dead Philosophers does aim for a broad, popular appeal, Critchley’s wily cataloging…

Reviews

REVIEWS IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER * BOOK REVIEWS Adrian, Chris A Better Angel — Chris Adrian Gob’s Grief — Chris Adrian The Children’s Hospital — Chris Adrian Alexander, Patrick Marcel Proust’s Search for Lost Time — Patrick Alexander Almond, Steve Rock and Roll Will Save Your Life — Steve Almond Appollodorus, Olivier and Lewis Trondheim Bourbon Island 1730 — Olivier Appollodorus…

Book Shelves #42, 10.14.2012

Art, Books, Literature, Writers

Book shelves series #42, forty-second Sunday of 2012 Couldn’t really get a good pic of the whole shelf, so in portions, starting with a spread of postmodernist favorites from years past. Julia Kristeva was a particular favorite of mine in grad school, but her Portable stands up well outside of, jeez, I dunno, theory and…

Despair/Food (Books Acquired 6.08.2012)

Books, Writers

 Dead Man Working is the latest from Carl Cederström (whose discussions with Simon Critchley became How to Stop Living and Start Worrying) and Peter Fleming. The book explores the existential despair of workers in our post-capitalist age. (It’s funnier than that description might suggest). Publisher Zer0′s blurb: Capitalism has become strange. Ironically, while the ‘age of work’ seems…

“Death in the Comic Tradition” — Tom McCarthy on Heroism and Authenticity

Books, Writers

A passage from Simon Critchley’s new collection of interviews and meditations, How to Stop Living and Start Worrying in which author Tom McCarthy (Critchley’s partner in the International Necronautical Society) talks about the question of an authentic, heroic self— . . . in the heroic tradition in literature, which pits the self against death in a…

“Declaration on the Notion of ‘The Future’” — The International Necronautical Society

Literature, Writers

At The Believer, you can read the entirety of “Declaration on the Notion of ‘The Future’” by The International Necronautical Society (aka Simon Critchley and Tom McCarthy (although we’re pretty sure that the essay’s authorization code TMcC010910 indicates that McCarthy is its author)). Playful and provocative stuff. A sample– 5. The INS rejects the Enlightenment’s version…

Odds and Ends

Art, Artists, Books, Literature, Music, Writers

At A Piece of Monologue, Rhys Tranter reviews Simon Critchley’s “philosophical antidote to the self-help manual,” How to Stop Living and Start Worrying. Read our review of Critchley’s The Book of Dead Philosophers here. MobyLives expands Flavorwire’s post on author photo clichés to include Melville House authors. Here’s an author photo we love: Harold Bloom…

HTMLGIANT Interviews Lee Rourke about His New Novel, The Canal

Books, Literature, Writers

At HTMLGIANT, Catherine Lacey interviews Lee Rourke about boredom, the writing process, dialogue, foxes, and his new novel The Canal. Read our review of The Canal here. From the interview: Your narrator speaks a lot about his philosophy on boredom. How much of this do you share with him? Well, I would have to say…

Jeremy Bentham’s “Auto-Icon”

Books

From Simon Critchley’s The Book of Dead Philosophers: In a text called Auto-Icon: or, Farther uses of the dead to the living, Bentham gave careful instructions for the treatment of his corpse and its presentation after his demise. If an icon is an object of devotion employed in religious ritual, then Bentham’s “Auto-Icon” was conceived…