A scattered riff on Thomas Pynchon’s novel Gravity’s Rainbow

I’m safe here at my office, away from Thomas Pynchon’s Gravity’s Rainbow. I almost certainly would not dare to write about it were it proximal. If the book were here with me, its text would infect me, and I’d replicate it in chunks here for you, dear reader, to sort out (or not sort out)… Continue reading A scattered riff on Thomas Pynchon’s novel Gravity’s Rainbow

“Nothing but Trouble” | Gordon Lish’s New Collection Goings Plays with the Problems of Language

Ostensibly a collection of fictional short stories, Gordon Lish’s Goings reads more like a memoir-in-fragments. All thirteen stories are told by a first-person narrator named Gordon, who parenthetically appends an exclamatory repetition of his name (“I, Gordon (Gordon!)”) throughout the work, a verbal tic that registers the tension between the author and narrator, memory and truth. All these… Continue reading “Nothing but Trouble” | Gordon Lish’s New Collection Goings Plays with the Problems of Language

Gordon Lish: “Don’t Believe Me”

From “A Conversation with Gordon Lish,” an outstanding interview between the writer/editor and Rob Trucks. The interview is really amazing—Lish talks at length about his writing process, his sense of competition, his friendships with Don DeLillo and Cynthia Ozick, his interest in Julia Kristeva, his feelings for Harold Brodkey and Barry Hannah—and Blood Meridian. Lots and… Continue reading Gordon Lish: “Don’t Believe Me”

Halloween Links

I suggest Count Dracula plays an uncredited cameo in Roberto Bolaño’s novel 2666 Seven horror stories masquerading in other genres Death (and life) masks. You can’t do better than From Hell (Alan Moore & Eddie Campbell) Seven more horror stories masquerading in other genres Roberto Bolaño’s powers of horror (I read 2666 through a Kristevan lens) Jonathan Littell’s The Kindly Ones:… Continue reading Halloween Links

Roberto Bolaño’s Powers of Horror

1. In Powers of Horror philosopher Julia Kristeva describes the idea with which she’s most closely identified, the abject, the intense horror our subjective psychology—and our bodies—experience when faced with corporeal reality: the edges of our body: filth, vomit, shit, blood, death: the me that is not me. Breakdown of subject and object: abject. 2. Julia Kristeva… Continue reading Roberto Bolaño’s Powers of Horror

Read “Labyrinth,” an Excerpt from Roberto Bolaño’s Forthcoming Work, The Secret of Evil

The New Yorker has published an excerpt from The Secret of Evil, the latest posthumous offering from Roberto Bolaño (new this spring from New Directions). The excerpt begins by extrapolating on a photo of some of the Tel Quel folks, (including a striking Julia Kristeva): They’re seated. They’re looking at the camera. They are captioned, from left to… Continue reading Read “Labyrinth,” an Excerpt from Roberto Bolaño’s Forthcoming Work, The Secret of Evil

Humiliation — Wayne Koestenbaum

Wayne Koestenbaum’s Humiliation explores the ways that having a body (among other bodies, among a social body) might leave us humiliated or otherwise abject. To perform this exploration, Koestenbaum surveys a discursive range of subjects, including the humiliation of public figures, the sordid “private” lives of celebrities, the work of philosophers and cultural theorists, and the… Continue reading Humiliation — Wayne Koestenbaum