Lady Macbeth Seizing the Daggers — Henry Fuseli

The Bard and the Bird (Shakespeare Portrait) — Bill Sienkiewicz

Beware

beware

Falstaff in the Laundry Basket — Henry Fuseli

Hamlet and the Gravedigger — Camille Corot

“Pathos” — Alice Meynell

“Pathos”

by

Alice Meynell

A fugitive writer wrote not long ago on the fugitive page of a magazine: “For our part, the drunken tinker [Christopher Sly] is the most real personage of the piece, and not without some hints of the pathos that is worked out more fully, though by different ways, in Bottom and Malvolio.”  Has it indeed come to this?  Have the Zeitgeist and the Weltschmerz or their yet later equivalents, compared with which “le spleen” of the French Byronic age was gay, done so much for us?  Is there to be no laughter left in literature free from the preoccupation of a sham real-life?  So it would seem.  Even what the great master has not shown us in his work, that your critic convinced of pathos is resolved to see in it.  By the penetration of his intrusive sympathy he will come at it.  It is of little use now to explain Snug the joiner to the audience: why, it is precisely Snug who stirs their emotions so painfully.  Not the lion; they can make shift to see through that: but the Snug within, the human Snug.  And Master Shallow has the Weltschmerz in that latent form which is the more appealing; and discouraging questions arise as to the end of old Double; and Harpagon is the tragic figure of Monomania; and as to Argan, ah, what havoc in “les entrailles de Monsieur” must have been wrought by those prescriptions!  Et patatietpatata. Continue reading ““Pathos” — Alice Meynell”

Orson Welles Is Falstaff in Chimes at Midnight (Full Film)