An interview with Scott Esposito, author of The Missing Books

  When I first heard about the concept for Scott Esposito’s new book The Missing Books, I thought, Damn. I wish I had thought of that. Then I read it and thought, Damn, I wish I had written that. The Missing Books is an ongoing e-book project, “a curated directory of books that do not exist, but should.” The… Continue reading An interview with Scott Esposito, author of The Missing Books

Privacy/Homesick (Books Acquired, Some Time Last Week, Both Bearing an Eye)

    Maybe you saw Garret Keizer on Colbert, or maybe you’ve read his stuff at Harper’s; anyway, his new little book Privacy seems pretty good. I’ve enjoyed all the titles in Picador’s BIG IDEAS // small books so far, and a scan over Privacy suggests another intriguing entry. Full review down the line. Roshi Fernando’s Homesick came out a few… Continue reading Privacy/Homesick (Books Acquired, Some Time Last Week, Both Bearing an Eye)

Books of 2010 — Noteworthy, Notorious, and Neglected

Biblioklept already busted out our Best Books of 2010 list, selecting ten of our favorite novels of the year. Such limitations help to generate lists, which internet folks love to circulate–you know the ritual–but those limitations can also prohibit a discussion of some of the other important books of 2010. So, without further ado– Jonathan… Continue reading Books of 2010 — Noteworthy, Notorious, and Neglected

Let us squeeze ourselves universally into the very milk and sperm of kindness | Moby-Dick reread, riff 25

I. In this riff, Chapters 94-98 of Moby-Dick. In these chapters, Ishmael (again) describes the business of rendering oil and etcetera from a whale’s corpse. The chapters show again Ishmael’s push-pull narration style, vacillating between the physical/commercial and the metaphysical/philosophical. II. Ch. 94, “A Squeeze of the Hand.” A perfect chapter in a perfectly imperfect… Continue reading Let us squeeze ourselves universally into the very milk and sperm of kindness | Moby-Dick reread, riff 25

The Complete Short Stories of J.G. Ballard (Sixth Riff: 1963-1964)

PREVIOUSLY: Introductions + stories 1956-1959 Stories of 1960 Stories of 1961 Stories of 1962 “The Subliminal Man,” Black Friday, and Consumerism IN THIS RIFF: “The Reptile Enclosure” (1963) “A Question of Re-Entry” (1963) “The Time Tombs” (1963) “Now Wakes the Sea” (1963) “The Venus Hunters” (1963) “End-Game” (1963) “Minus One” (1963) “The Sudden Afternoon” (1963) “The Screen Game” (1963) “Time of Passage” (1964) “Prisoner of… Continue reading The Complete Short Stories of J.G. Ballard (Sixth Riff: 1963-1964)

An interview with Margaret Carson about translating Remedios Varo’s Letters, Dreams & Other Writings

As a huge fan of Remedios Varo’s art, I was thrilled last year when Wakefield Press published Margaret Carson’s Letters, Dreams and Other Writings. I reached out to Margaret, who was kind enough to talk to me about her translation in detail over a series of emails.  In addition to Letters, Dreams and Other Writings Margaret Carson’s… Continue reading An interview with Margaret Carson about translating Remedios Varo’s Letters, Dreams & Other Writings

Read Edgar Allan Poe’s doppelgänger tale “William Wilson”

    “William Wilson” by Edgar Allan Poe   What say of it? what say of CONSCIENCE grim, That spectre in my path? Chamberlayne’s Pharronida. LET me call myself, for the present, William Wilson. The fair page now lying before me need not be sullied with my real appellation. This has been already too much… Continue reading Read Edgar Allan Poe’s doppelgänger tale “William Wilson”

Gaddis Contra Carnegie | How to Win Friends and Influence People in The Recognitions

The second episode of Part II, Ch. 5 of William Gaddis’s 1955 novel The Recognitions returns to the consciousness of sadsack everyman Mr. Pivner. Through milquetoast Mr. Pivner (the long-lost father of poseur-supreme Otto), Gaddis critiques the banal emptiness and rank venality of post-war life in America. In this particular section of The Recognitions, Gaddis reinforces… Continue reading Gaddis Contra Carnegie | How to Win Friends and Influence People in The Recognitions

A riff on rereading Carson McCullers’ novel The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter

I’m not really sure what made me pick up Carson McCullers’ 1940 début novel The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter to read again. Actually, writing that sentence makes me remember: I was purging books, and the edition I have is extremely unattractive; I was considering trading it in. But I started reading it, realizing that I… Continue reading A riff on rereading Carson McCullers’ novel The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter

An interview with literary critic Daniel Green about his new book, Beyond the Blurb

Daniel Green’s The Reading Experience was one of the first sites I started reading regularly when I first started blogging about literature on Biblioklept. If you regularly read literary criticism online, it’s likely you’ve read some of Green’s reviews in publications like The Kenyon Review, 3:AM, Full Stop, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Full Stop, and more. Green’s got a… Continue reading An interview with literary critic Daniel Green about his new book, Beyond the Blurb

“An Upheaval,” a short story by Anton Chekhov

“An Upheaval” by Anton Chekhov English translation by Constance Garnett MASHENKA PAVLETSKY, a young girl who had only just finished her studies at a boarding school, returning from a walk to the house of the Kushkins, with whom she was living as a governess, found the household in a terrible turmoil. Mihailo, the porter who… Continue reading “An Upheaval,” a short story by Anton Chekhov

“Berenice” — Edgar Allan Poe

“Berenice” by Edgar Allan Poe Dicebant mihi sodales, si sepulchrum amicae visitarem, curas meas aliquantulum forelevatas. —Ebn Zaiat. MISERY is manifold. The wretchedness of earth is multiform. Overreaching the wide horizon as the rainbow, its hues are as various as the hues of that arch—as distinct too, yet as intimately blended. Overreaching the wide horizon… Continue reading “Berenice” — Edgar Allan Poe

Chapter X of James Weldon Johnson’s Masterpiece, The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man

Among the first of my fellow-passengers of whom I took any particular notice was a tall, broad-shouldered, almost gigantic, colored man. His dark-brown face was clean-shaven; he was well-dressed and bore a decidedly distinguished air. In fact, if he was not handsome, he at least compelled admiration for his fine physical proportions. He attracted general… Continue reading Chapter X of James Weldon Johnson’s Masterpiece, The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man