“A Brief History of the Passenger Pigeon” — Lynn Pedersen

“A Brief History of the Passenger Pigeon”

by

Lynn Pedersen


Not to be confused with messenger pigeons, birds sent behind enemy lines in war, but think passengers as in birds carrying suitcases, sharing a berth on a train, or traveling in bamboo cages on a ship, always migrating on a one-way to extinction. How would extinction look on a graph? A steady climb, or a plateau, then a precipitous cliff at the dawn of humans?

Nesting grounds eight hundred square miles in area. Skies swollen with darkening multitudes. Days and days of unbroken flocks passing over. Ectopistes migratorius.

And the last of the species, Martha, named for Martha Washington, dies in a cage in 1914 at the Cincinnati Zoo.

Forget clemency. We are the worst kind of predator, not even deliberate in our destruction. Our killing happens à la carte, on the side (side of Dodo?).

And because the nineteenth century did not enlist a battlefield artist for extinctions, there are no official witnesses to the slaughter, just participants. If you could somehow travel back to this scene, through the would-be canvas, you would run flailing your arms toward the hardwood forests and the men with sticks and guns and boiling sulphur pots to bring birds out of the trees, as if you could deliver 50,000 individual warnings, or throw yourself prostrate on the ground, as if your one body could hold sway.

1 thought on ““A Brief History of the Passenger Pigeon” — Lynn Pedersen”

  1. Beautifully described endless sorrow. Yes we are a murderous species and I hope for our immediate extinction even though it will take those unparalleled humans with it. They were not enough to save us or they did not sacrifice their lives to do it? Too many humans born of fornification as Jesus warned and Krishnamurti continues,

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