James Madison and the Making of America (Book Acquired, 1.15.2013)

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James Madison and the Making of America, by historian Kevin R. C. Gutzman, is new in trade paperback. A blurb from the author’s website:

Instead of an idealized portrait of Madison, Gutzman treats readers to the flesh-and-blood story of a man who often performed his founding deeds in spite of himself: Madison’s fame rests on his participation in the writing ofThe Federalist Papers and his role in drafting the Bill of Rights and Constitution.

Today, his contribution to those documents is largely misunderstood.  He thought that the Bill of Rights was unnecessary and insisted that it not be included in the Constitution, a document he found entirely inadequate and predicted would soon fail.

Madison helped to create the first American political party, the first party to call itself “Republican”, but only after he had argued that political parties, in general, were harmful.

Madison served as Secretary of State and then as President during the early years of the United States and the War of 1812; however, the American foreign policy he implemented in 1801-1817 ultimately resulted in the British burning down the Capitol and the White House.

In so many ways, the contradictions both in Madison’s thinking and in the way he governed foreshadowed the conflicted state of our Union now.  His greatest legacy—the disestablishment of Virginia’s state church and adoption of the libertarian Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom—is often omitted from discussion of his career.

Yet, understanding the way in which Madison saw the relationship between the church and state is key to understanding the real man.  Kevin Gutzman’s James Madison and the Making of America promises to become the standard biography of our fourth President.

 

 

Frederic Remington Letter

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From the LOC:

Two champions of the old West share their common interest in this illustrated letter from sculptor, illustrator, and painter Frederic Remington to writer Owen Wister. Both originally Easterners, the two men had met in 1893 when Wister went to Wyoming for his health. In this letter to his new friend, Remington muses about the instability of his paintings, which may fade in time “like pale molasses,” but he suggests that his new work in bronze–“a cowboy on a bucking broncho”–will “rattle down through all the ages.”