Dougal Dixon’s Man After Man (Book Acquired 6.30.2012)

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I found a first edition hardback copy of Dougal Dixon’s cult book Man After Man not quite two weeks ago when I was browsing books for my cousins’ kids, who I would see over the July 4th holiday. I’ve possessed an illicit digital copy of Man After Man for a few years, but it’s not nearly as fun as the real thing. As its subtitle attests, Dixon’s book is an anthropology of the future, a sort of speculative sci-fi textbook that imagines a future-history of genetically engineered humanity. The illustrations by Philip Hood (who deserves bigger billing) are especially weird and wonderful. Some samples below.

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5 thoughts on “Dougal Dixon’s Man After Man (Book Acquired 6.30.2012)”

    1. Oui, je l’ai découvert là-bas.

      I’d given up actively looking for it a few years back. It was piled with a stack of graphic novels (I was looking for Jeff Smith’s Rose for a cousin’s kid). Twelve bucks, or nothing, really, after all the trade credit I have there.

      Now: Find Codex Seraphinianus for under 10 bucks.

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      1. Well, a brief browse reveals that more copies of “Man After Man” have turned up here and there over the years, for the lowest price now stands at $24.20 for Good. May have to indulge, though I would much prefer, as you did, to find it where none were meant to find it, like one of the eggs in the carton at Publix being a Fabergé.
        Cliquez ici, Monsieur, pour voir

        As for your challenge: done. The Kindle edition is only $8.99.

        2nd Edition Codices Seraphiniani may be had for only $109.34 now, though without the Calvino introduction, it seems. This unreadable masterpiece is categorized thusly: “Language Notes – Text: Latin.” Ph’nglui mglw’nafh Ser’aph’ini A’Ma-Zon wgah’nagl clighagn

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        1. I have the Kindle edition of Codex (as well as two separate editions that are floating around illicitly in e-form), and it’s nice (my daughter loves its weirdness), but I’d love the real deal, obviously.

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