A review of Saul Steinberg’s The Labyrinth

My review of NYRB’s reissue of Saul Steinberg’s Labyrinth is up at The Comics Journal. First paragraph:

First published in 1960 and back in print again from the New York Review of Books, Saul Steinberg’s The Labyrinth condenses the modern and the mythic into 250 pages of strange and wonderful cartoons. The fourth of Steinberg’s seven major compilations, The Labyrinth covers his work between 1954 and 1960, loosely distilling the state of American mid-century cartooning. Quirky, obliquely intellectual, cosmopolitan, and deeply ironic, Steinberg’s modernist approach addresses many of the major cultural changes in America during the 1950s. The Labyrinth touches on urbanization and suburbanization, the expansion of ready-made mass culture, the post-War shift in the relationship between men and women, the advent of televisual mass media, and the zany paranoia of the Cold War zeitgeist.

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3 thoughts on “A review of Saul Steinberg’s The Labyrinth”

  1. Bought.

    Seriously, I’m thinking, for the sake of my bank account (and domestic tranquility) that you should stop doing reviews, because I buy too many of the books you review — your reviews are simply too compelling.

    I’m not sure the preceding was a strong disincentive. ;-/

    G

    Liked by 1 person

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