“. . . and seizing them up by their hair and passing their blades about the skulls of the living and the dead alike and snatching aloft the bloody wigs”

Blood Meridian week continues–more jolly times.

Buffalo hunter Ralph Morrison killed and scalped by Cheyennes in December 1868, near Fort Dodge, Kansas. Photographer: William S. Soule (1836-1908).
Indian Warrior with Scalp, 1789, by Barlow.
The Death of Jane McCrea, by John Vanderlyn, 1804.
Robert McGee, circa 1861.
Eastern, Sioux (Native American). Scalping Knife and Sheath, 1801-1833
Engraving after Captain Seth Eastman, US Army, of a male and female scalp strung on frames, with combs, feathers and a pair of scissors. Circa 1847.
Hannah Duston
Death Whoop by Seth Eastman. Late nineteenth century.
"A scene on the frontiers as practiced by the 'humane' British and their 'worthy' allies," attributed to William Charles, 1812.

4 thoughts on ““. . . and seizing them up by their hair and passing their blades about the skulls of the living and the dead alike and snatching aloft the bloody wigs””

  1. Has anyone looked into the quote mentioned by McCarthy at the opening of Blood Meridian about scalping being practised in prehistoric times?

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  2. According to several contemporary whites, Jane McCrae was actually hit by friendly fire from American militia trying to rescue her from the Indians in British pay before being scalped. The older woman taken with her was brought in unharmed, except that the Indians stole her outer garments. During most Indian wars, whites also scalped Indians.

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    1. Hey, John—not sure if you’ve read Blood Meridian, but it’s basically about a group of white men (well, most of the men are white) scalping (both literally and metaphorically) everyone they encounter.

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